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#1 2014-08-31 03:06:23

ClassicHasClass
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From: Electron Alley
Registered: 2014-05-26
Posts: 1,085
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The perils of classic hardware doing useful things

Since 1999 I have had a IIci as a server, first as my apartment server when I just had dialup, handling tasks I needed a Unix box for (it ran NetBSD), and then acting as internal DNS and AppleTalk server when I got DSL and moved the Apple Network Server in. Its downtime has only been interrupted by blowing out caps on cache cards periodically, so much so that I eventually just removed the cache card, since it doesn't have to be fast, just there.

Today I noticed the network was abnormally slow even for internal resources. I thought the switch had freaked out or something, but no: the IIci was clicking on and off repeatedly as if it could not start. I replaced the power supply, and no help, so I replaced the logic board with a nicely recapped one I bought from uniserver a while back. BONG! And after almost ten minutes to check its 128MB of RAM and fsck the disk in NetBSD, it was back in action.

I think the old board probably just needs to be recapped too, and will probably work again.

Here's to 15 more years of service!~

http://www.floodgap.com/iv/2315

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#2 2014-08-31 03:13:50

LCGuy
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From: Sydney, Australia
Registered: 2014-05-13
Posts: 810

Re: The perils of classic hardware doing useful things

Thats pretty awesome that you actually use a 68k as part of your network infrastructure. All my infrastructure is modern, and while my server looks ancient (beige full size ATX tower cicra 1999), it has all modern guts. So really, good on you smile

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#3 2014-08-31 07:06:26

ClassicHasClass
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From: Electron Alley
Registered: 2014-05-26
Posts: 1,085
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Re: The perils of classic hardware doing useful things

There's lots of old hardware running the show here. The main file server is a Sawtooth G4 with a FW800 RAID array, and the NFS server is a MIPS-based Cobalt RaQ. There's also an Alpha Micro Eagle 300 for giggles. In that sense the IIci is merely representative. smile

Though the master internal/external server is an IBM POWER6, so there is some recent kit on duty.

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#4 2014-09-01 02:47:55

markyb
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From: Bedford, OH USA (216)
Registered: 2014-05-16
Posts: 182
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Re: The perils of classic hardware doing useful things

That's awesome. I always feel bad that I can't use my most cherished machines for actual objectives in the current day.. but this gives me hope!


http://markyb.applefool.com for a list of my computers, my blog, and some random resources.

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#5 2014-09-01 05:10:40

ClassicHasClass
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From: Electron Alley
Registered: 2014-05-26
Posts: 1,085
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Re: The perils of classic hardware doing useful things

Well, the fact that it runs NetBSD helps.

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#6 2014-09-01 16:22:56

jt
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From: Bermuda Triangle, NC USA
Registered: 2014-05-21
Posts: 1,391

Re: The perils of classic hardware doing useful things

Way cool

I don't have an infrastructure per se. SneakerNet/100/250z here. neutral

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#7 2014-09-02 03:42:58

ClassicHasClass
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From: Electron Alley
Registered: 2014-05-26
Posts: 1,085
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Re: The perils of classic hardware doing useful things

Here's thule in its native environment.

http://tenfourfox.blogspot.com/2014/09/ … -plus.html

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#8 2014-09-07 18:06:38

IIfx
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From: VA, USA
Registered: 2014-09-07
Posts: 91

Re: The perils of classic hardware doing useful things

My "infrastructure" consists solely of a Asus RT-N66U router fed by a Comcast-leased Arris TM722G modem (28mb/5mb) as I am trying to keep the power bill down. I have a 1995 Compaq Proliant dual-Pentium tower beast that makes an AMAZING vintage infrastructure hub (not a mac but capable)! Running Windblows New Tea 4 Server I could share with Mac's using Appletalk and PC's using SMB, bridge the modern and the ancient, and toy with an early dual CPU rig.

6866986169_f9a1eb91ea_z.jpg

Here it is set up when I had Lab 2. Today its in a closet under a pile of stuff until I make more room.

Amazing that you can use a IIci for DNS today. Its not practical, but its neat. I would be rather nervous using a 68k 24/7 as they were never really designed for that role *(regardless of Apple reselling some as Workgroup Servers with minimal changes)

Last edited by IIfx (2014-09-07 18:07:38)

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#9 2014-09-07 20:55:29

ClassicHasClass
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From: Electron Alley
Registered: 2014-05-26
Posts: 1,085
Website

Re: The perils of classic hardware doing useful things

It's quite responsive, especially since it has so much RAM nothing touches the hard disk when it gets going. For that specific purpose and AppleTalk it does very well to this day.

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