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#1 2019-01-16 02:25:51

Nuclear_Selftest
Member
Registered: 2019-01-16
Posts: 2

Gutted Macintosh Color Classic | Should I restore it?

So I was walking home from school today, and I noticed something peculiar next to an abandoned building. No...that couldn't be what I think it is...could it?
IMG-20190115-080836.jpg

So I approached the machine. Lo and behold, it's exactly as I thought: an actual Macintosh Color Classic.
IMG-20190115-080849.jpg

(Yes, I found it exactly as you see in the image)

The thing was totally waterlogged. As in, I picked it up and water started pouring out waterlogged. I immediately noticed the lack of a motherboard, which made sense. But then I looked inside (back slid off w/ no screws...suspicious), and found that it wasn't just the motherboard missing, but ALL boards were missing, with only the CRT, drives, and ribbon cables left. I guess that means the water damage isn't much of an issue...

I've wanted a Color Classic for so long, and I've managed to stumble upon the soulless husk of one.

That begs the question: Should I restore it from soulless husk? It seems like it isn't worth it, but I don't want to see this machine go in the trash. The motherboard isn't much of an issue, since there's so many different boards that are compatible with this chassis. But since the ever-illusive analog board is also gone, I'm having trouble seeing this thing work again.

I'm a high school student, and I'm on a tight budget. What do I do?

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#2 2019-01-16 02:45:51

jt
Member
From: Bermuda Triangle, NC USA
Registered: 2014-05-21
Posts: 1,465

Re: Gutted Macintosh Color Classic | Should I restore it?

I can't imagine bothering to rebuild it as a stock CC. Is the neck of the CRT broken? If so it let the vacuum out and that's not just worthless, it'll cost you money to recycle Which might be why it was stripped and curbed for adoption. Are the plastics in decent shape? Your pic links are borked.

If were in high school and on a tight budget, I'd probably do a reversible MacQuarium so the parents wouldn't think it was "junk/clutter" to be tossed while I built a PowerCC one piece at a time over the long haul. Air powered plastic fish don't require much care. wink

Last edited by jt (2019-01-16 02:49:01)

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#3 2019-01-16 03:11:03

Nuclear_Selftest
Member
Registered: 2019-01-16
Posts: 2

Re: Gutted Macintosh Color Classic | Should I restore it?

All of what's left of the mac is ok; the CRT is not broken thankfully. The plastics need a good clean with some alcohol (someone drew on it with sharpie), but otherwise not a problem. My parents do understand well enough to not dismiss it as trash, but a reversible MacQuarium isn't a bad idea smile

If I must slowly assemble it one piece at a time, I will. I just worry about a new analog board, since those original ones are the devil to find. Is there another mac AIO model that has a compatible analog board? I suspect this is going to have to be an unexpected Takki build.

I could check the area where I found it, just in case the boards remain there in stroke of extreme luck.

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#4 2019-01-16 08:04:27

LCGuy
Administrator
From: Sydney, Australia
Registered: 2014-05-13
Posts: 855

Re: Gutted Macintosh Color Classic | Should I restore it?

Given that it doesn't have its analog board, I'd probably actually be considering removing the CRT, selling it to someone who needs a Colour Classic CRT, and install an LCD in its place.

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#5 2019-01-17 05:15:12

jt
Member
From: Bermuda Triangle, NC USA
Registered: 2014-05-21
Posts: 1,465

Re: Gutted Macintosh Color Classic | Should I restore it?

Yeah, that Trinitron CRT is the bombe, but there's something to be said for finding on of the 10" Color Monitors in VGA if you're looking at the PowerCC options. 640x480 hacking at whatever refresh rate of CC is one thing, but 640x480@60Hz opens up the world of AV input cards, 800x600 and even 1028x764 if you opt for a 6500 board. I've got one that's interlaced and it's plenty good enough. Trinitrons I've got in 17"- 21" sizes where they belong. smile

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ThinkClassic specialises in the use, maintenance, repair, restoration and modification of vintage computers and peripherals.