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#1 2015-07-07 19:33:22

Hotdog Zanzibar
Member
From: Columbus, OH
Registered: 2014-07-25
Posts: 83

Treating the old plastics

Has anyone ever had any luck trying to treat these old plastics with some sort of solution or lubricant that might "soak into" the plastic and make it less brittle?

I have a MIGHTY NEED!! for some bezels, but even if I find any intact, I'm terrified of breaking them when I install them.

Folks have been toying with the idea of creating new bezels with 3D printers, but I've yet to see any concrete progress on it...


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#2 2015-07-07 19:56:54

bbraun
Member
Registered: 2014-05-29
Posts: 1,064
Website

Re: Treating the old plastics

For 3D printed replacement bezels, the hardest part is getting the design, particularly with the rounded pieces.  The most reasonable way to go about it IMO is to send a complete one off to a 3D scanning house and have them come up with the model.  Last time I looked into it, it'd be about $100 for them to make the model, possibly more depending on how much cleanup it needed after the scanning process.  Which bezel are you thinking about?  The 9600's floppy bezel seems to be a commonly broken/missing one, as are the CD and blank bezels for the 810/840/8100/8500, so those might be a reasonable place to start the process.

Some smaller 3D scanners are coming on the market at almost reasonable prices, but there's tradeoffs.  High accuracy means small scanning volume, and even the width of many case bezels might be too long.

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#3 2015-07-08 21:37:37

Hotdog Zanzibar
Member
From: Columbus, OH
Registered: 2014-07-25
Posts: 83

Re: Treating the old plastics

Yep, you got it -- Quadra 840AV. The only one I have that isn't broken is the blank bezel.

Also, the Q950 CD-ROM bezel is proving to be rarer than unicorn poop.


Daily Driver: TITAN - Mac Pro 1,1 - dual 3GHz quad-cores, 16GB RAM, 128GB SSD w/ 3TB RAID storage, GeForce 570 GT 1.25GB
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Looking for: Plus, Color Classic, DuoDock, Portable, Duo 280 keyboard, Q950 CD bezel, TAM, AppleVision 1710AV

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#4 2015-07-08 22:45:11

MJ313
Member
Registered: 2014-09-23
Posts: 498

Re: Treating the old plastics

Once the butadiene (or the B in ABS) breaks down due to UV light and environmental conditions, that's kind of all she wrote. The butadiene is what supplies the elastic properties. Short of using gamma rays to cause crosslinking, you are out of luck.  And who wants to do that smile

I'd be real interested in hearing about the 3d scanning sources you came up with Rob! I'd like to print me up some feets.

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#5 2015-07-08 23:06:09

uniserver
Member
From: Sf, Mi
Registered: 2014-05-15
Posts: 956
Website

Re: Treating the old plastics

yea some Q700 feets


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#6 2015-07-08 23:46:25

bbraun
Member
Registered: 2014-05-29
Posts: 1,064
Website

Re: Treating the old plastics

I haven't looked into the services too deeply, and without really having any experience in the area, I was just going to to with 3dscanservices or similar.  The two kind of hobby level scanners seem to be Matter & Form's and MakerBot's although it sounds like makerbot is having some teething problems after being acquired a while ago.  They're both pretty pricey as toys, although I suspect it wouldn't take too many scans to pay for its self, given the prices of the scanning services.  I have no idea how the qualities compare between these devices and the services, although the nice thing is the services can clean up the scans for you into something actually useful.  It seems like the software to do really good cleanups is about as expensive as the scanners, not to mention the time it takes.

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#7 2015-07-09 03:21:46

bbraun
Member
Registered: 2014-05-29
Posts: 1,064
Website

Re: Treating the old plastics

MJ313 wrote:

Short of using gamma rays to cause crosslinking, you are out of luck.

Bruce Banner just became my new best friend.

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#8 2015-07-09 10:52:05

MJ313
Member
Registered: 2014-09-23
Posts: 498

Re: Treating the old plastics

Spindler Plastic?

410050.jpg

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#9 2015-07-09 14:54:55

jt
Member
From: Bermuda Triangle, NC USA
Registered: 2014-05-21
Posts: 1,408

Re: Treating the old plastics

First: I haven't tried it yet, but using a hair dryer to reduce brittleness of bezel clips/parts during the removal/installation process has crossed my mind more than once.

Second: I'm about as far from a purist as you're likely to find. roll For the 840AV, I've got the OE caddy loader/bezel. But if I didn't, the tray loader/bezel from a FUBAR cased 8500/9500 would wind up in/on that sucker in a heartbeat.

Third: Q700 feets ought to be the easiest ever! They're well within the limits of resin casting for starters. Are they ABS or Rubber? If the former, I'd look into a soft tooled injection mold for recycling bits/pieces/shards of shattered SpindlyPlast.

First off though, I'd try casting a Q700 feet in translucent resin with socket provision for HDD access LED mod  .  .  .

.  .  .  but I'm crazy. tongue

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#10 2015-07-09 15:51:42

MJ313
Member
Registered: 2014-09-23
Posts: 498

Re: Treating the old plastics

jt wrote:

Third: Q700 feets ought to be the easiest ever! They're well within the limits of resin casting for starters. Are they ABS or Rubber? If the former, I'd look into a soft tooled injection mold for recycling bits/pieces/shards of shattered SpindlyPlast.

I think the first step in this quest will be to learn a bit more about the Q700 feets. I know they've been discussed before, but this is a new day and age. I'll start a new thread soon, because I *believe* the feets are rubber (the little flat ones are, but I am not so sure about the little cans) and I don't want to blow-up Hotdog's thread about ABS.

Last edited by MJ313 (2015-07-09 15:51:54)

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#11 2015-07-10 02:56:24

LCGuy
Administrator
From: Sydney, Australia
Registered: 2014-05-13
Posts: 821

Re: Treating the old plastics

My Q700 feets are rubber (the rectangular ones) - looking at pics I suspect the round ones might be ABS?

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#12 2015-07-10 12:55:14

MJ313
Member
Registered: 2014-09-23
Posts: 498

Re: Treating the old plastics

LCGuy wrote:

My Q700 feets are rubber (the rectangular ones) - looking at pics I suspect the round ones might be ABS?

Q700 feets discussion thisaway!

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#13 2015-07-10 17:54:14

mcdermd
Member
From: Corvallis, OR
Registered: 2014-05-12
Posts: 970
Website

Re: Treating the old plastics

Nope. The round ones are rubber too. Check out the aforementioned feet thread.


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